What is a Seedling Heat Mat and Why Should You Should Get One For Your Vertical Vegetable Garden

closeup of the top of a vertical vegetable garden

With the new year among us, it’s time to start thinking about spring—and most importantly, your garden. Around this time of year, many people are itching to get their hands in the dirt while there’s still snow on the ground. Fortunately, there are many ways to start prepping for your vertical vegetable garden months before it’s time to start planting, such as starting your seeds early. In this article, we’ll give you all you need to know about how you can start your garden prep early this year with a handy seedling heat mat.

What is a Seedling Heat Mat?

Learning About Root Temperature, Seed Starting, and More

closeup of seedlings on heat mat

A seedling heat mat is an inexpensive investment that can be reused for multiple years that allows users to start their seeds indoors while it’s still too early to plant. This helpful tool allows you to grow from seed in a predictable and controlled environment, meaning there are never any surprises when it comes to how your plants will grow. The heat mat does this by evenly heating seeds and soil at a controlled temperature to speed up the germination process and grow seeds in a fraction of the time. 

The mat also allows you to grow a flat bed of many different species of plants and stagger the seed starting so all plants are around the same size at the time of your last frost date. Additionally, this mat is portable and can be used anywhere in your house or garage, meaning you can keep growing out of your main living space.

Why Should I Get One For My Vertical Vegetable Garden?

Shorter Germination Periods and Other Perks

closeup of plants growing in Garden Tower®

Not only does a seedling heat mat allow you to grow in a controlled environment, but it’s also a cheaper and safer alternative to buying plants at your local store. Seeds cost significantly less than garden-ready plants and growing your own reduces the gamble of buying an unhealthy plant from the store. Along with this, using a seedling heat mat keeps roots 10-20 degrees above room temperature and reduces germination periods by 1-3 weeks

Additionally, this is a great way to test out expired seeds you have laying around to see if they’re still usable. It’s important to be patient with them and give them around twice the time suggested by the seed company to grow, however if they don’t germinate while in the correct environment you can start over before losing too much time.

How Do I Use a Seed Mat?

Setting Up For Your Vertical Vegetable Garden

vegetables growing in top of vertical vegetable garden

The first step is deciding what size is best for your wants and needs—think about how many plants you want to have in your garden and pick a size from there. For example, our very own Garden Tower® holds 50 plants, so someone growing in it would need a heat mat that would fit a 50-plant tray on it at least. Once you’ve determined the size, place it on a stable, dry surface in an indoor location to start your planting.

Our seed starting kit is an excellent and cheap way for beginners to start their seeds for the first time as well as experts looking for an easier and all-inclusive way to grow. By including starting soil, the seedling heat mat, lids and pots, as well as a seed gift card, you’ll have the perfect garden in no time.


No matter where you live or what scale of gardening you do, a seedling heat mat is the best and most cost-effective way to produce healthy plants indoors so you can start your garden as soon as your last frost date comes. Not only can you save money by purchasing seeds instead of fully-grown plants, but you can also have complete control and supervision over the entire growing process for the year. Interested in urban gardening or starting your seeds indoors? Learn more about Garden Tower Project today and make your gardening dreams a reality.

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